Posts Tagged FontVista

FontVista for Macintosh v 4.5.1 Update Now Available

FontVista is a professional font catalog and inspection tool that will create a type specimen book (or “font catalog”) to be used as a desk reference for design professionals who need a quick way to locate just the right typeface for a given project.


What’s new in version 4.5.1

– Mac OS X Lion 10.7 support and compatibility
– Miscellaneous fixes

Useful features include:

– Font activation and printing of installed or uninstalled fonts
– Print directly to PDF (Portable Document Format) or Printer
– Load and print thousands of fonts using customizable layouts
– Slide show preview of all your fonts

* FontVista requires Mac OS 10.5 or higher, and a PowerPC or Intel Processor.

* A demonstration version can be downloaded from www.FontGear.net

* FontVista is available for $29.99/Single User License

* FontVista can be ordered and downloaded from our website at http://www.FontGear.net using all major credit cards, or by calling 1-800-583-2917.

FontGear Inc. is a leading professional software company for Macintosh and Windows, specializing in font application tools for creative professionals and the publishing industry. FontGear Inc. is located in Charlotte, North Carolina.

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Mac OS X Lion (10.7) Compatibility

 

We are working hard to update all of our software products for Apple’s newly released version of Mac OS X (v. 10.7, called Lion)

Over the next few days we will announce the updates as they become available and will be offered as free updates to our existing customers.

All of our test show that there are no major issues with any of our existing products running on Lion. Most of the problems we’ve seen so far are related to then user interface (window refreshes, controls not drawing correctly, etc.)

If you have any questions or concerns about any of our products then please feel free to contact us here.

 

 

 

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FontVista 4.5

FontGear, Inc. of Charlotte, NC announced today the release of FontVista for Macintosh version 4.5

FontVista is a professional font catalog and inspection tool that will create a type specimen book (or “font catalog”) to be used as a desk reference for design professionals who need a quick way to locate just the right typeface for a given project.

Useful features include:

– Font activation and printing of installed or uninstalled fonts

– Print directly to PDF (Portable Document Format) or Printer

– Load and print thousands of fonts using customizable layouts

– Slide show preview of all your fonts

FontVista supports many font formats: Macintosh PostScript Type 1, Macintosh TrueType font suitcases, Apple dfont, PC TrueType (.ttf), and OpenType (.otf).

FontVista requires Mac OS 10.4 or higher.

A free demo version can be downloaded here

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What we do

I recently had my brother and his wife in town for a visit. We had a great time just hangin out and getting caught up. At one point in our conversation his wife asked “now what exactly do you do?” I love that question (and I get it a lot) because it gives me a chance to talk about some of the ways we’ve been able to help people with the frustrations and difficulties of dealing with fonts. I know that may sound strange, but I guess I’m wired that way.

My thinking is that when people are happy with their fonts (or at least not having problems with them) they can get back to what they’re good at  – art, design, production, whatever they bought their Mac for in the first place.

Inevitably in a conversation about what what we do, I mention the software and what it does.

Here’s the run down…

FontDoctor for Macintosh

As the name suggests, FontDoctor will diagnose and fix font problems – things like missing bitmaps fonts, missing PostScript fonts, damaged fonts, fonts that just don’t work on your system, etc. It can also organize your font files into a new clean font library by family, foundry, name, etc.

FontXChange for Macintosh

FontXChange converts fonts between different font formats. You can switch between OpenType, PostScript Type 1, TrueType, etc. This is great because as older formats become obsolete (PostScript Type 1, TrueType) you can still use your fonts by converting them to the newer OpenType format. Also, it will convert between different computers – Mac to Windows and vice-versa.

FontGenius for Macintosh

FontGenius looks at images that contain typography, like photographs, online pics, etc., and will identify the most likely font family. It also provides download links to fonts that are identified. Very cool.

FontVista for Macintosh

FontVista finds all your fonts, installed or not, and creates a catalog of font samples. The catalog can be saved as a PDF that you can share with your clients and/or printer, or you can print it out to create a reference book.

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Preview fonts quickly in Mac OS X

Mac OS X Leopard provides easy font preview feature.

Apple introduced a new technology in Mac OS X 10.6 (a.k.a. “Leopard”) called “Quick Look”. This feature allows you to preview the contents of any file on your hard drive without having to actually open the file. To use it, just click on a file and press the “Space” bar. This is a great feature, but you may not know that it’s particularly useful when previewing font files and font folders.

If you select a group of font files or a folder full of font files then hit the Space bar you will get a window that displays a collection of previews allowing you to decide what font you might want to use – even before you install it.

You can also zoom the preview in and out using the “Command +” and “Command -” key strokes, respectively.

Another way to preview your fonts in Leopard is to open a folder that is full of font files then click the “Cover Flow” view icon in top button bar of the window.

For  a more complete font preview tool you may also want to consider FontVista for Macintosh.

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Test your eyesight

Historic eye chart influences typographic design.

Although February 19 recently passed without much fanfare, it is in some ways a historic day. That’s the birthday of Herman Snellen. Do you remember those old eye-charts ? You had to cover one eye and stand at some specific distance away form the chart, then say out loud all the letters you could read. Herman Snellen was the inventor of that chart – the Snellen eye chart.

What’s interesting is the influence the Snellen chart has had in graphic design.

Although his idea was to use typography in a purely mechanical sense (i.e. the chart text has no meaning), over the years designers have leveraged the familiarity of the Snellen chart to create a graphic context that conveys meaning through typography.

Here’s a few of my favorites…

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